No Walls To Build reminds us of a gym, but also resembles a building site. A gym hall is one of the places we go to make ourselves into a ‘better’ version. A fitter, healthier and more perfect person.

Does that person exist, or are we all working towards an illusion? There is a limit to the extent we are able to create and remake ourselves, and why would we even bother? Keep the imperfections, the broken parts, embrace them. Damaged or just unpolished parts are not shortcomings, they tell stories.

No Walls To Build is an installation on the vulnerability of the human body, and the way we all deal with that vulnerability.

There is a very strong tendency to fix imperfections and broken parts. On the one hand to make life a bit easier, but also to meet the ever changing beauty norms. We put braces in our mouths to make our teeth look prettier, replace our hip bone with a stainless steel substitute when it breaks, go running to lose weight or work out intensely to tone our muscles.

Eva van Essen explores the interaction between objects and people, especially in decor design. People often gain dominance over their backdrop – this happens on stages, but in real life in general as well.

Compression looks at the possibilities of a more balanced interaction, in which human and installation are equal and pressure is evenly distributed. Both people and objects often experience pressure, be it in very different ways, and this can be a positive or a negative condition.

During this graduation show there will be one, two or no actors interacting with the installation. But rather than perform, they become an actual part of the decor. By this, Compression tries to explore the ways humans can be equal to the objects around them, instead of dominating over everything.

Having sometimes one, sometimes two and sometimes no one present makes it possible to research the difference between human and object, actor and decor. How would it feel to be a supporting construction, to be under constant pressure?

Sculpture is often seen as one of the most static forms of art, but in Synergy, this is not the case at all. This work invites you to interact with it, to touch it.
Touching the material, moving around it or with it activates their forms. They become bodies of their own, their curves remind of something human, and like humans, they have a life of their own.

Breaking ceramics is not a disaster in Synergy. Quite the opposite, actually: every crack and flaw in the material adds something to the object. Little bumps and scars make the material come alive.

No Walls to Build

installation 2019

/ ceramic, glass, latex, metal, cement 
/ images: Stephanie Korthout

 

Synergy

installation 2019 / ceramic, latex 
/ images: Lea Föger

 

Compression
installation 2020

/ ceramic, wax, metal
/ actors: Dinda Provily en Jurjen Zeelen
/ images: Puck Kroon en Roeltje van de Sande Bakhuijzen

 

In this short study, the artist explores the relation between artwork and public, focusing on the awkwardness of the viewer of the video.

Some images remind us of other images, and it isn’t hard to figure out the metaphor in the video. Is it porn, is it obscene, or completely meaningless? Why do you keep watching? Why do you want to stop?

You, as a viewer, add your own meaning, interpreting this short video. What does this say about your imagination?

In this study, form is created through use of your own body. The iron sheet is a malleable, pliant object and invites its viewers to use their own body as a tool.

There is no fixed result or end form, the iron is in conversation with whoever touches it. It reacts and recreates the form or position, and is an ever changing part of its own context.

It is an invitation to consider the role of art when there is no one to watch or touch it, and to think about the way surroundings change when we touch them. With our hands, our whole body or just with our eyes.

Compression installation 2020

/ ceramic, wax, metal /actors: Dinda Provily en Jurjen Zeelen / images: Puck Kroon en Roeltje van de Sande Bakhuijzen

 

Eva van Essen explores the interaction between objects and people, especially in decor design. People often gain dominance over their backdrop – this happens on stages, but in real life in general as well.

Compression looks at the possibilities of a more balanced interaction, in which human and installation are equal and pressure is evenly distributed. Both people and objects often experience pressure, be it in very different ways, and this can be a positive or a negative condition.

During this graduation show there will be one, two or no actors interacting with the installation. But rather than perform, they become an actual part of the decor. By this, Compression tries to explore the ways humans can be equal to the objects around them, instead of dominating over everything.

Having sometimes one, sometimes two and sometimes no one present makes it possible to research the difference between human and object, actor and decor. How would it feel to be a supporting construction, to be under constant pressure?

No Walls To Build is an installation on the vulnerability of the human body, and the way we all deal with that vulnerability.

There is a very strong tendency to fix imperfections and broken parts. On the one hand to make life a bit easier, but also to meet the ever changing beauty norms. We put braces in our mouths to make our teeth look prettier, replace our hip bone with a stainless steel substitute when it breaks, go running to lose weight or work out intensely to tone our muscles.

No Walls To Build reminds us of a gym, but also resembles a building site. A gym hall is one of the places we go to make ourselves into a ‘better’ version. A fitter, healthier and more perfect person.

Does that person exist, or are we all working towards an illusion? There is a limit to the extent we are able to create and remake ourselves, and why would we even bother? Keep the imperfections, the broken parts, embrace them. Damaged or just unpolished parts are not shortcomings, they tell stories.

Sculpture is often seen as one of the most static forms of art, but in Synergy, this is not the case at all. This work invites you to interact with it, to touch it.

Touching the material, moving around it or with it activates their forms. They become bodies of their own, their curves remind of something human, and like humans, they have a life of their own.

Breaking ceramics is not a disaster in Synergy. Quite the opposite, actually: every crack and flaw in the material adds something to the object. Little bumps and scars make the material come alive.

In this short study the artist explores the relation between artwork and public, focusing on the awkwardness of the viewer of the video.

Some images remind us of other images, and it isn’t hard to figure out the metaphor in the video. Is it porn, is it obscene, or completely meaningless? Why do you keep watching? Why do you want to stop?

You, as a viewer, add your own meaning, interpreting this short video. What does this say about your imagination?

In this study form is created through use of your own body. The iron sheet is a malleable, pliant object and invites its viewer to use their own body as a tool.

There is no fixed result or end form, the iron is in conversation with whoever touches it. It reacts and recreates the form or position, and is an ever changing part of its own context.

It is an invitation to consider the role of art when there is no one to watch or touch it, and to think about the way surroundings change when we touch them. With our hands, our whole body or just with our eyes.